323-622-8991
CA, US
MurphyAye
MurphyAye
2013-02-27 00:06:57
Prank Call
707-703-1414 Lynn Taylor. Was beginning to get disappointed because I hadn't heard from my DEA friends for several months.
Dee
Dee
2013-02-15 01:26:36
Unknown
Sorry...New York number is 515-882-6633. Regarding the scam on the DEA. I called her back...got the answer machine...but still said her name...Lt. Lynn Taylor of the DEA  I left message...that I talked with my lawyer...who is investigating and told me of the scam. Interesting if I get a call back!!!
Dee
Dee
2013-02-15 01:22:35
Prank Call
Caller #516-888-6633 Lt. Lynn Taylor New York...Total Scam...threatening...3:06 pm to Illinois.
dee
dee
2013-02-15 01:07:37
Unknown
I also ...just this afternoon received a call from form this stupid woman...Lynn. Got me very upset. Actually threatened to have me arrested unless I paid a fine.  I told her her I would have to talk to my lawyer first...she said she would initiate the arrest. New York call. Nice Valentines' Day message. I hope they catch these scammers really soon!!!!
Grandma
Grandma
2012-12-28 00:57:03
Unknown
I received the call today from Lt. Lynn Tayler from the DEA. @ 909-810-2162 ex. 1824. I also called the real DEA to give them this #.
Alfalfa
Alfalfa
2012-10-01 20:23:18
Unknown
ALERT - EXTORTION SCAM - ALERT

DEA Warns Public of Extortion Scam by
DEA Special Agent Impersonators

The Drug Enforcement Administration is warning the public about criminals posing as DEA special agents or other law enforcement personnel as part of an international extortion scheme.

The criminals call the victims (who in most cases previously purchased drugs over the lnternet or by telephone) and identify themselves as DEA agents or law enforcement officials from other agencies.  The impersonators inform their victims that purchasing drugs over the lnternet or by telephone is illegal, and that enforcement action will be taken against them unless they pay a fine.  In most cases, the impersonators instruct their victims to pay the "fine" via wire transfer to a designated location, usually overseas.  If victims refuse to send money, the impersonators often threaten to arrest them or search their property.  Some victims who purchased their drugs using a credit card also reported fraudulent use of their credit cards.

Impersonating a federal agent is a violation of federal law.  The public should be aware that no DEA agent will ever contact members of the public by telephone to demand money or any other form of payment.

The DEA reminds the public to use caution when purchasing controlled substance pharmaceuticals by telephone or through the Internet.  It is illegal to purchase controlled substance pharmaceuticals online or by telephone unless very stringent requirements are met.  And, all pharmacies that dispense controlled substance pharmaceuticals by means of the lnternet must be registered with DEA.  By ordering any pharmaceutical medications online or by telephone from unknown entities, members of the public risk receiving unsafe, counterfeit, and/or ineffective drugs from criminals who operate outside the law.  In addition, personal and financial information could be compromised.

Anyone receiving a telephone call from a person purporting to be a DEA special agent or other law enforcement official seeking money should refuse the demand and report the threat.

Report Extortion Scam: 1-877-792-2873

http://www.deadiversion.usdoj.gov/pubs/pressreleases/extortion_scam.htm
7076564727
7076564727
2012-10-01 20:20:32
Unknown
Today I received a very disturbing call from a person claiming to be a DEA officer. She preceded to tell me that police officers were in route to arrest me. She went by the name of LT. Lynn Taylor.  She said I could spend anywhere from 5 to 7 years in prison, for illegally purchasing diet pills over the Internet in 2006. First off I never purchased drugs over the Internet.  I am good moral person and role model in my community. I completely panicked. She had me comvinced that the agents were going to search my house and arrest me at my place of work.  Then she said I could pay $7,000 fine to the Domican Republic. I told her I needed to speak to my husband or a lawyer first. She then told me they could be considered an accessory to charges. I completely freaked out. I had to leave work early and it ruined my entire day. I googled the number and name. I found out that This is a  huge scam. I am thrilled that I didn't give them any money. I was tempted though. Something needs to done to these people. I feel super violated. What a low life human being.
notstupid
notstupid
2012-09-26 02:55:20
Unknown
Lt. Lynn Taylor is still active.  Recieved a call last week threatening arrest, search warrant, etc.  I also had a call several months ago that was similiar. I called local DEA & they informed me of the scam.  I hope others do not fall for this.
Relieved
Relieved
2012-04-24 01:31:30
Prank Call
I just received the same call and it scared the crap out of me. When you call back, their message states that it's the DEA. Luckily I searched on her name and this site came up. It was a major relief for us but I want report this incident. I will probably call my local police department and the DEA.
kristakae
kristakae
2012-03-02 21:00:27
Unknown
I got the same call today, from a "Lieutenant Lynn Taylor" from 408-775-7959.  Same story, that a package containing drugs had been confiscated etc...and that there was an arrest warrant for me and a search warrant for my home.  Scary! Luckily, my boyfriend is a cop and told me not to call her back or anything and that it was a scam.  Apparently the DEA would never call and warn you that they're going to arrest and search, because they would just kick in the door!  They wouldn't give you warning and time to run if you really were a criminal!  It is unsettling, though, because with identity theft, etc...it makes you panic for a minute thinking maybe someone used your info to purchase drugs!
cheryl
cheryl
2012-02-02 19:18:25
Unknown
I got the same call but it was from (408)775-7939
Cheryl
Cheryl
2012-02-02 18:50:22
Unknown
I got the same kind of call.  When I said I would let them speak to my lawyer (who was present) they hung up.
SN
SN
2012-01-25 21:30:32
Unknown
I  had a voicemail from a Special Agent Marcucci saig he was with the DEA and needed to talk to me immediately. I called back this number, says it's in Montebello, CA. The lady who andswered the phone had the craziest voice I have ever heard. She transferred me to Det. Marcucci who said that they had confiscated a package of mine and gave me an address that I lived at over 8 years ago. I asked what kind of package and he asked if I knew it was illegal to purchase medications over the interent? I told him I did over 8 years ago and he said it was an ongoing investigation. I then told him that I had to have my actualy Dr's approval to get this medication and I didn't know nor was I tood it was coming from another country. He said that they issued a warrant for my arrest and he would be calling agents in my town in the next few minutes to come and pick me up. HE said I would be facing 3-7 years minimum in prison. He then transferrred me to Lt. Taylor who told me the same story. I told her that I needed more information and asked how to spell the detectives name and her name and where exactly she was calling from. She got annoyed. I then askd her if she was familiar with the statute of limitations and that if I ordered something over 8 years ago it wouldn't hold up in court. And that I didn't live at the address anymore where the supposed package was sent. I then said I worked for a Law Firm, which I actually do, and she hung up. I called back 8 times and they kept hanging up on me. I left them a VM saying that I knew this was a scam and I would be pressing charges.

I then called from my law office, after speaking with one of the attorneys here who looked up the number and found this website, and recorded the conversation. She said that she had already talked to me and gave me the opportunity to get out of the warrant but I said I had legal representation and would take it up in court. I told her I did not say that that she hung up on me. She denied it. She said she had already signed the paperwork for the warrant and the local agents would be by any minute to arrest me. I asked her what I could do to prevent this and she said it was too late. I said ok and then she said I would have to pay  $6900 but she would give me a break and pay $4500 and I neede to wire the money to the Dominican Republic. I asked her how to do this and she said that I needed to confirm that i would be making this payment. Knowing this was a scam, I told her I couldn't give her a definate answer. She said, ok then I'll go ahead and notify the local agents. I told her to go ahead b/c I am at an attorneys office and I know this is a scam b/c I looked up the number on the internet and to send them on! She hung up.

I don't know who to report this to, but I want to do something about it. I know there are people out there who are falling for this and it's just not right.
maryellen
maryellen
2012-01-24 22:08:15
Unknown
I just received 2 calls from this number (this time it was a woman!)..the 1st claimed they were with the DEA.  Must be some type of scam!!!
Creepy
323-622-8991
323-622-8991
2012-01-19 23:21:54
Unknown
We just received the same call from the same person.  She really had my husband going until she mentioned the money thing.  I wonder how many poor saps believe this nonsense and send them money.
323-622-8991
323-622-8991
2012-01-19 20:16:46
Unknown
Please report this phone number via the following link =http://www.accessdata.fda.gov/scripts/email/oc/oci/contact.cfm. It is the FDA's suspected fraud link.
Scott
Scott
2012-01-17 23:31:17
Unknown
I received the same call today, they kept trying to say I needed to get a lawyer for purchasing pills online that I have never purchased!

I said I will need to speak to my personal lawyer first before this goes further and hung up.

This  is a scam!
thesellman
thesellman
2012-01-17 21:11:53
Prank Call
My experience was the same as many on here.  Lt. Lynn Taylor is hard at work pretending to be calling in relation to alleged offenses related to online pharmacies, etc.  She had a few legitimate sound bites in her script but as soon as she offered up the ability to pay a fine and mentioned the Dominican Republic I figured it to be fake and hung up.  She called back and left a vmail that I would be arrested immediately.  I wish I would have Googled in real time or I would have known her position doesn't exist and to simply remind her it is a felony to impersonate a federal officer.
Ricardo
Ricardo
2012-01-13 21:57:52
Unknown
Same story here:  Got a call on my cell phone from a Lieutenant somebody, claiming she was from the DEA, said she had a confiscated package and asked if I knew that ordering drugs by phone or over the Internet was illegal.  I said I didn't know about any package arriving, but the cell reception conked out.  I Googled the phone number on the CallerID and found this site.  She called back a few minutes later saying that I had hung up on her; I told her that I didn't hang up, that the call dropped, but that I looked up her number on the Internet and found a long thread about fraudulent and threatening calls.  She hung up immediately.

I've called the local office of the DEA and reported that someone was impersonating a DEA agent--DEA doesn't have a tile of "lieutenant."  They said they'd look into it.

I'm not worried about getting a call-back from these scammers, since they know I'm on to them.  But if you continue to get calls from them, you can use *60 to block their number on most phone systems.
Cynthia
Cynthia
2012-01-13 06:18:58
Unknown
I also received a message from a Lt Lynn Taylor from the FDA at my job. She also sounded very legit. She led me on and gave me to much information. The same squeal about me getting arrested and since it's my first offense my penalty is $5000 but if I pay $3500 Dominican Republic will drop all charges....Be Careful - The number finally appeared in my phone and it came from Montebello.  I hope they get caught. There's a lot of people involved doing this with different names. I finally went on-line and searched her name and came across this site... Confirmed my suspicion.....
Not Going to Rip me Off!
Not Going to Rip me Off!
2012-01-12 23:06:16
Unknown
Wow!  I just received a voice mail at my work from a "Lt Lynn Taylor from the FDA" claiming she confiscated a package of mine, had a warrant for my arrest and a search warrant for my home.  I called the number back and no one answered and I got an answering machine stating this was "the Food and Drug Administration, please leave a message ..."  I hung up.  I warned my front desk receptionist about this caller and not to give out any information.  I then Googled her name and phone number and found so much information about this SCAM these people are trying to pull!

A few minutes had passed and "Lt Lynn Taylor" hit re-dial and told my receptionist someone called her and didn't know who it was.  She put her on hold and told me it was Lynn Taylor again.  I picked up the line and said "Hello."  Then there was some hesitation and this woman starts to speak and said "Someone called this number and I don't know who it was."  I was very stern and said "You are calling a law firm and I have no way of knowing who called you."  This woman was puzzled and said "Excuse me?"  Then I again repeated to her that she is calling a law firm and I can't assist her.  She said "Okay" and hung up!
John
John
2012-01-12 19:14:33
Unknown
PS - I meant "Lynn Taylor" and to Lt Taylor, that call you didn't answer at 11:56 Pacific Time was the REAL DEA.
Got that Right
Got that Right
2012-01-12 19:13:09
Unknown
Absolutely--

FDA NEWS RELEASE

For Immediate Release: Jan. 7, 2011

Media Inquiries: Christopher Kelly, 301-796-4676 christopher.kelly@fda.hhs.gov

Consumer Inquiries: 888-INFO-FDA

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is warning the public about criminals posing as FDA special agents and other law enforcement personnel as part of a continued  international extortion scam.

The criminals call the victims -- who in most cases previously purchased drugs over the Internet or via "telepharmacies" -- and identify themselves as FDA special agents or other law enforcement officials. The criminals inform the victims that purchasing drugs over the Internet or the telephone is illegal, and that law enforcement action will be pursued unless a fine or fee ranging from $100 to $250,000 is paid. Victims often also have fraudulent transactions placed against their credit cards.

The criminals always request the money be sent by wire transfer to a designated location, usually in the Dominican Republic. If victims refuse to send money, they are often threatened with a search of their property, arrest, deportation, physical harm and/or incarceration.

"Impersonating an FDA official is a violation of federal law," said Dara Corrigan, the FDA?s associate commissioner for regulatory affairs. ?FDA special agents and other law enforcement officials are not authorized to impose or collect criminal fines. Only a court can take such action.?

In most instances, victims of extortion-related calls have also received telephone solicitations for additional pharmaceutical purchases from other possibly related, illegal entities located overseas. The extortionists use customer lists complete with extensive personal information provided through previous purchase transactions. These include names, addresses, telephone numbers, Social Security numbers, dates of birth, purchase histories and credit card account numbers.

Typically, these criminals use telephone numbers that change constantly and make it appear as though their calls originate in the United States.

No known victim has been approached in person by a law enforcement impersonator associated with this scheme.  

The FDA?s Office of Criminal Investigations, with the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration, and the U.S. Immigrations and Customs Enforcement, Homeland Security Investigations, with the support of various U.S. Attorneys, are pursuing multiple national and international criminal investigations.

Arrests have been made and additional prosecutions are pending; however, the scheme is likely to continue. The FDA has issued similar warnings in the past:

§  FDA Warns Public of Extortion Scam by FDA Impersonators1 (11/12/2008)

§  FDA Warns Public of Continued Extortion Scam by FDA Impersonators2 (12/29/2009)

Victims of this scheme who have suffered monetary loss through the payment of funds in response to an extortion call from a person purporting to be an FDA or other law enforcement official regarding illegal pharmaceutical transactions may obtain a victim questionnaire by contacting the FDA?s Office of Criminal Investigations3 and clicking ?Report Suspected Criminal Activity.?

Anyone receiving a purported official document on agency letterhead may verify its authenticity by contacting that organization directly via a publicly available phone number. Additionally, all federal agencies use email addresses with a ?gov? email extension.

The FDA also reminds consumers that pharmaceutical products offered online and by telephone by sources of unknown origin can pose a substantial health risk. Products recovered during this investigation that were purchased from online or telephone sources have been found to contain trace amounts of heroin, other undisclosed and potentially harmful active pharmaceutical ingredients, or no active ingredient at all. Purchases should only be made from licensed pharmacies located in the United States. In addition to the increased risk of purchasing unsafe and ineffective drugs from Web sites operating outside the law, personal data may be compromised.

For more on unlawful drug sales on the Internet, see Protecting Yourself4.

Questions and Answers
How did these people obtain my information?

They likely obtained the victim?s information based on a previous online or telepharmacy transaction, or from a submitted medical questionnaire. These instances could have occurred years ago, with personal information now on customer lists trafficked by these criminal groups.  These customer lists can contain tens of thousands of names and a substantial amount of self-reported data provided by consumers during previous transactions.  Typically, victims are being contacted by multiple unrelated groups, often for different purposes. (extortion, selling illegal pharmaceuticals, etc.)

How do I make the calls stop?

The extorters, just like the majority of telephone solicitors for illegal prescription medication, are based overseas and use voice over internet protocol (VOIP) telephone numbers, most commonly ?Magic Jack?.  These services provide the extorters with the flexibility to constantly change their phone numbers and select ones with U.S. area codes.  If the victims  change whatever number(s) were used to contact them, and do not engage in any additional risky pharmaceutical transactions, the threatening phone calls and associated telephone solicitations for pharmaceuticals should cease.

What proactive steps can victims take?

Individuals who purchase medication online or via tele-pharmacies are frequently victims of credit card fraud, since this is how the medication is often purchased.  Victims may want to consider alerting their applicable financial institutions to ensure that identity theft has not occurred.

Why is FDA only asking victims who have lost money to contact the agency?The most effective way to track these criminals is to investigate the permanent record established when money transfers take place.

Have individuals been arrested?

Yes.  However, this scheme will likely not be eradicated and instead will continue to evolve.  For example, the extorters now occasionally reference other countries, such as Costa Rica, instead of the DR, as means to avoid all of the publicity regarding this scheme.

Am I going to be able to get my money back?

In almost all instances victims will not be able to recoup losses.  Multiple criminal groups employ this scheme, principally from overseas, and large monetary seizures are not anticipated.

Am I in danger?

In terms of physical danger, no victim has ever been approached in person, and the vast majority of these callers, regardless of their intent, are based overseas.  Their use of ?police-type scanners?, law enforcement language and fictitious documents are attempts at a false sense of legitimacy. Extorters also occasionally reference cars parked on a victim?s street -- information that can be obtained online at various Web sites, as a way to frighten individuals into believing the extorters are near their residence.  If an individual feels threatened for his or her personal safety, immediately contact the appropriate local enforcement agency.

Is it possible that these callers are part of some ?secret? investigative group, and FDA is just not aware of it?

No.  Law enforcement officials from both the U.S. and the Dominican Republic are pursuing these criminals.   More information regarding this scheme is available on FDA and DEA Web sites, or through online searches.  Extradition proceedings  between countries require close cooperation and often a formal treaty, and this often takes an extended period of time to complete.

http://www.fda.gov/ICECI/CriminalInvestigations/ucm239309.htm
John
John
2012-01-12 19:11:42
Unknown
Same thing here. A**holes. Reported separately below.
John
John
2012-01-12 19:10:00
Prank Call
Got a call from "Lt Lynn Harper" of DEA, saying they had a search warrant and arrest warrant for me, but after a long story, they could work it out to only pay a fine. Called local DEA office and they said "BOGUS"
Animal
Animal
2012-01-12 11:13:27
Unknown
NYC, you don't need to change your phone number. Call your phone provider and ask for sure but my provider is Verizon and if you get an unwanted call, you just dial *60 and calls from that number will be blocked forever. Animal
NYC
NYC
2012-01-11 21:10:17
Unknown
BTW - when you call the number above - the recording says it is the FDA. It is not. When you call the real FDA there is no "Lt Lynn Taylor."

Here is the REAL FDA phone number: 1-888-INFO-FDA (1-888-463-6332)?main FDA (for general inquiries) or go to fda.gov
NYC
NYC
2012-01-11 21:05:59
Unknown
I received a call from "Lt Lynn Taylor from the FDA" claiming she confiscated a package of mine, had a warrant for my arrest and a search warrant for my home. I had a lawyer return her call and have not heard back. I know it is a scam. I may consider changing my phone number if I continue getting calls like this.
Mike Tyson
Mike Tyson
2012-01-11 18:07:24
Unknown
Claims to be an agent from the FDA and that they have confiscated property of mine and a warrant to search my home. Hopefully someone will catch these a***oles and throw them in the slammer. I'd love to find the bi*** who called me and kick her a**!
Bob
Bob
2012-01-11 01:44:06
Unknown
Woman called and claimed to be from the Food and Drug Admin.  Illegal purchase of a controoled substance.  I kept talking to her until she hung up in fustration.
1-604-630-9785 1-719-695-0926 1-720-432-7247
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