888-443-8239
Resident47
Resident47
2012-12-28 15:36:59
Unknown
Bill the Shill has had an entire month to "call tomorrow and let everyone know" how his unconditional surrender to a lawbreaking debt collector went. Bill the Shill never reported again. Bill the Shill may have old debts, but it's a fair guess his commission checks come from CFG. He won't be earning spiffs off the backs of you fine readers because you're not so stupid as he hopes.
Badge714
Badge714
2012-12-06 17:08:46
Unknown
What a read! Reminds me of those old health give-aways from years ago. Toss up between "How to clean a toilet" and "How do you ask a girl for a date?" Thanks for marking them as fake. They'll never make it as writers for "Law & Order".
Kyle
Kyle
2012-11-28 15:48:45
Unknown
Ya gotta hand it to them.  They are devious little critters and so convincing.
Resident47
Resident47
2012-11-28 01:23:25
Unknown
I know, what a laugh riot. He's "still a fugitive of the law". As we speak he's running through the woods with a team of police dogs yapping behind.

Thoughtfully he paused for heavy breath long enough to comment here and attempt setting up the readers for failure. Defendants in debt cases who "explain circumstances to a judge" lose always and lose badly. The point of showing up to a hearing is to bloody the opposition's nose, not cry for a pity discount. The judge mostly plays referee and cashier; she *cannot* play your ally. Unprepared defendants usually don't realize that until they hear a gavel thwack and the phrase "judgment for the plaintiff".
Resident47
Resident47
2012-11-28 00:52:15
Unknown
Sewer service is a big problem but not universal. Collector plaintiffs rely on their defendants not to defend, to react with fear and apathy, and they need not bend any court rules to get it. Their favorite soft targets are immigrants, minorities, and the poor and anyone thought to be too ignorant to show some backbone.

The shills here have tried hard to perpetuate those fears of confrontation and loss. Consumer defeat is not inevitable. The worst that can happen from fighting back is the same as from doing nothing; it's insane not to try.
GiG
GiG
2012-11-28 00:51:47
Unknown
"How about a warrant was issued for my arrest because I failed to disclose my financial info"?!
BS!
Resident47
Resident47
2012-11-28 00:04:11
Unknown
Re-aging debt could well be part of the strategy. In some jurisdictions, faint admission of liability is enough to reset the SoL clock.

The comment's theme is here in this lament that "instead of calling the collection agency she's simply ignored [it]". We hear this refrain from all the rogue collectors, that their targets are all "deadbeats running from their problems". The shill wants alleged debtors to feel their best option is to bend over and keep quiet for whatever punishment the collectors say is deserved. This idea is hammered in each of the shill's three paragraphs, and echoed elsewhere in this thread.

This view is of course very slanted, a distraction to hide the legal tools which can ruin the collectors' plans before and during litigation. The one correct implication of the shill's remark is that ignoring the debt collectors allows them to create a worse problem. Surrender without a fight is precisely what they want, therefore what they must be denied.
tom
tom
2012-11-27 15:18:44
Unknown
So why post about it on a site that is concerned with identifying unknown telephone callers?   Makes about as much sense as posting your (questionable) story on an auto repair blog site.

By the way, your comment about "...so I'm thinking they'd be willing to drop the case as long as she acknowledges the debt is real and she starts paying again," gives me the impression the statute of limitations has run on a lot of the zombie debt you are trying to collect on, and you're trying to con people into "refreshing" the debt by getting people to acknowledge it and start paying.  You're one tricky shill. ;)
tom
tom
2012-11-27 15:10:53
Unknown
The reason they don't show up is because the plaintiff makes darn sure the defendant never receives notice there  is a lawsuit.   "Sewer service" is an essential component of the collections industry.
yef
yef
2012-11-27 04:26:12
Unknown
Possibly on Mars, since all these posters have been determined to be fake!
Resident47
Resident47
2012-11-26 23:27:54
Unknown
You're assuming like your shill pals that all lenders are honest, all debts are voluntary, and all creditors win all lawsuits. It's better still to *dispute* debt and to force collectors to "set terms to comply" with the laws they must follow.
Resident47
Resident47
2012-11-26 23:12:55
Unknown
I won't tear into sock puppet "Cathy" except to note her smokescreen insinuation that a creditor could "file a judgment" *after* garnishing wages.

Beating the original creditor is harder than a collector or junk debt buyer but not hopeless. In two words: "arbitration clause". Household contracts name JAMS as an alternate venue. Once elected by the consumer, the courtroom conveyor belt to a judgment must halt and the defendant gains great leverage. What usually follows is a comfortable settlement, a mutual walkaway, or a dismissal. Milage may vary depending on consumer counterclaims and other variables.
Resident47
Resident47
2012-11-26 22:43:04
Unknown
Maybe your "family friend" should pay that $3200 for you if he thinks it's such a hot deal for inflated and uncontested debt. Why don't you try consulting a lawyer who is not related and has actually prosecuted FDCPA claims? Better still, read about the law yourself and then reassess your position.

http://www.ftc.gov/os/statutes/fdcpajump.shtm
http://www.consumerfinance.gov/guidance/supervision/manual/fdcpa-narrative/

Hints: If this "offer" letter is truly your first notice, it's required to have several disclosures and also required NOT to say certain things. The conduct of whatever rep you reach today is also heavily regulated. Never ask ''How do I pay?'' Always demand, ''Prove I owe!''
Ashley
Ashley
2012-11-26 22:32:31
Unknown
Look at dem fakers, man.
Payback
Payback
2012-11-26 22:29:58
Unknown
Well if they come here and start lying, all you gotta do is tag their lies. That way people would know that they are a bunch of deceptive frauds.
Resident47
Resident47
2012-11-26 22:24:47
Unknown
I believe their shills have disrupted this site before. Well, now that their fearmongering sock puppets have been tagged in this thread, we can get to work properly on debunking them. You notice that nobody is discussing phone calls but the room was seemingly full of armchair paralegals.

There are scraps of accurate advice here, but presented to intimidate and not educate. The running theme of the shills: "Courtrooms are scary, so pay up or file bankruptcy." But the legal chatter is all tilted toward the debt collector as the snake and the alleged debtor as the mouse. The consumer also has legal tools, some of which may defeat the collectors long before the talk turns to lawsuits.
Julia
Julia
2012-11-26 20:17:00
Unknown
The fake messages are marked. Stay safe!

http://800notes.com/forum/ta-6ad34e9c9e44ce0/fakers-888-443-8239
Alfalfa
Alfalfa
2012-11-26 20:13:49
Unknown
All the debt settlement companies will do is take the money and run. She needs to contact her local Legal Aid Society for assistance in getting a consumer law attorney and file for bankruptcy.
Shill Alert
Shill Alert
2012-11-26 20:11:44
Unknown
Looks like the fakers are back. What's the matter, can't you scare your victims enough on the phone, you have to try to do it here too?

Sad. Does your mom know you exrtort money for a living, or are you "collecting" from her too?
ramond
ramond
2012-11-26 20:08:57
Unknown
Admin Edit: "It's a FAKE comment!"
_____________________________


I recently met a nice gal who's made some of the worst financial moves ever. The most pressing problem is $4000 of debt with collection agencies. She's been unable to pay for months, yet instead of calling the collection agency she's simply ignored the statements. Today she was sued her for the debt + attorney's fees.

She has no money and no assets. Even if they go to court and a judgement is made against her in this amount, she'll have to get on a monthly payment plan like she is now. This isn't really worth much to the credit agency, so I'm thinking they'd be willing to drop the case as long as she acknowledges the debt is real and she starts paying again.

So where to go from here? I thought of debt consolidation, but read some articles that said those services aren't all they're cracked up to be. Plus I didn't see any of them say anything about what to do once you've actually been served. Is it a bad move to call the agency directly and try to work something out? Or now that she's actually been served does she pretty much have to go to court?
Caller: lawyer
Jerry
Jerry
2012-11-26 18:22:59
Unknown
Admin Edit: "It's a FAKE comment!"
_____________________________


I  just went through wage garnishment. Made the grave mistake of taking a home equity loan first (another story) with then HSBC Beneficial which extended the offer for a credit card limit 1,500. Due to divorce, fell behind on payments with the card and equity loan. Just finished wage execution, but the kicker was prior to the wage execution, how about a warrant was issued for my arrest in the midst of attempting to resolve the matter via payment arrangements because I failed to disclose my financial information. The debt has since been paid (thank goodness) and I don't have to deal with that aspect (i.e. HSBC Orchard Bank credit card debt), but am still a fugitive of the law. How about the law firm it was sold to still insists that I provide my financial information after the debt has been paid? Only when h_ll freezes over. Living in Newark, NJ you would think the courts have real criminals to worry about. Go figure. Therefore, unless you enter into a payment arrangement or you need to go to the court to plead your case. You should have received a court notice and date for an opportunity to explain your circumstances to a judge (and have a darn good argument regarding why not) the wage garnishment is as good as done.

Of if you are willing to enter into a settlement for less than the amount owed, but get it in writing....and do be sure to review the fine print to ensure that HSBC will not come back in the future to collect the balance. Since its 5k you may want to have a lawyer represent you in the discussions....otherwise, they will lie quicker than a cat can lick itself.

I know....been there done that, Wish you luck!
Alfalfa
Alfalfa
2012-11-26 16:50:35
Unknown
Check the date of the last activity on this credit card. If it is over six years, they cannot enforce the collection of the debt in a court of law. Go here and check the SOL in your state:

http://www.fair-debt-collection.com/statue-limitations.html
Alfalfa
Alfalfa
2012-11-26 16:43:36
Unknown
Yes--and so has a family member. HSBC has a long-standing history of ruthlessness in dealing with distressed customers. They have no remote interest in "working" with anyone except to collect payment in full and will take you to court--even if you are considered judgment-proof. Your only hope is to file for bankruptcy.
Alfalfa
Alfalfa
2012-11-26 16:36:41
Unknown
OK. A poster finally named this outfit:

Crown Financial Group, Inc./AKA CFG & Associates
PO Box 276202, Boca Raton, FL 33427-6202
http://www.cfgassociates.net

Not surprisingly they have an "F" rating with the BBB.

http://www.bbb.org/south-east-florida/busines ... ton-fl-90015300
cathy
cathy
2012-11-26 16:21:47
Unknown
Admin Edit: "It's a FAKE comment!"
_____________________________


Has anyone been sued by HSBC Household bank for credit card debt. I had a credit card with HSBC and have not made payments on it since end of last year. now they are taking me to court to garnish my wages and file a judgment. has this happened to anyone? have you ever been to court with HSBC over something like this? the debt with them is 5k.
kurt
kurt
2012-11-26 16:16:00
Unknown
Admin Edit: "It's a FAKE comment!"
_____________________________


Instead of trying to get out of something you owe, contact the company and see if you can setup payments.Interesting how everyone gives advice on how to get out of a debt you owe!
Bill
Bill
2012-11-26 04:33:21
Unknown
I just got home from a Thanksgiving trip and have a letter from CFG & Associates offering a voluntary settlement offer and notifying me to contact this phone number. I had a credit card from years ago that is now $4400 even though I originally only had just over 2000 on the card. I want to avoid going to court and talked to my attorney (who is a family friend) and he suggested taking the settlement for 3200. This is the first I have heard of this and he said I'm lucky I received anything at all offering the settlement. I'm going to call tomorrow and see how this works out. I'll let everyone know how it turns out.
Leo
Leo
2012-11-26 03:05:49
Unknown
Always read your credit card financial contract thoroughly you never know when your old credit card debt will come back and haunt you until you have a civil judgment enforced against you. Pay your credit card debt this is serious try to settle or set terms to comply if you are in collections before its too late and you are sued. Its better to pay off debt voluntarily that thru the court system.
Resident47
Resident47
2012-11-25 01:59:53
Unknown
That's also my question. There is quite a flurry of recent "legal paper" talk here, yet curiously no one has gotten around to reading us the name(s) printed next to "Plaintiff" or "Plaintiff's Counsel".
Alfalfa
Alfalfa
2012-11-24 16:12:22
Unknown
Who is this company?
1-206-496-0411 1-905-581-0089 1-877-888-9790
Call Type:
Comment:
Your name:
Validation:
© WHOSCALL.IN 2011-2017 - Privacy